The Hispanic-Anglosphere ...

National flower of Chile found at Tyntesfield

Don’t miss the latest addition to our online exhibition  all about one of the first  – if not the first – artistic depictions of the national flower of Chile, the copihue, discovered by one of our colleagues in the walls of NT Tyntesfield, the country residency established by William ‘Guillermo’ Gibbs (1790-1875) near Bristol, UK.

The finding got also a mention in the August-September National Trust Inspire podcast ( https://soundcloud.com/inspiresw ) where the work of our AHRC-University of Winchester research network project The Hispanic-Anglosphere … in general featured highly. In fact, we served as ‘bait’ for the whole programme… so if you want to avoid the self-proclaimed clichéd presentation (which sadly also reduced the whole of the Hispanic world to Iberian Spain) and other items, we would suggest to just start listening from 40:00 in the track.

Enjoy!

Dissidents’ dead end: help to uncover the story

Check the latest addition to the series of ‘Key Locations’ of our online exhibition where Prof. Manuel Llorca-Jaña traces the troubled origins of the Dissidents Cemetery’ in Valparaiso, Chile. While so doing, he identified a number of individuals of Scottish, Irish and perhaps also English origin about whom there is still much to discover.

If you think that you have information that could help us to reveal their life stories, please drop us an email (hispanicanglosphere@gmail.com)!

The exhibition Exploring the Hispanic-Anglosphere”  is one of the outcomes of the international research network project ‘The Hispanic-Anglosphere: transnational networks, global communities (late 18-early 20th century) funded by the AHRC in partnership with the National Trust-Tyntesfield and currently under the curatorship of the project’s Principal Investigator Dr Graciela Iglesias-Rogers.

The information throughout the exhibition has been peer-reviewed and it is based on disclosed and verifiable sources.  There is no prescribed route to the visit, but if you are in a hurry, you can start by clicking  HERE  .When you are done with that panel, simply click on the message ‘the exhibition continues> to go through the rest of the exhibition.

‘Transition’ – Full videos, podcast and reports now available

Just click HERE to get the full podcast and videos accompanied by brief guiding reports prepared by our publicity officer Charles Ball of the public conversation entitled Transition: tips and ideas from the Hispanic-Anglosphere (late 18th – early 20th centuriesthat we held on Saturday 11th May 2019 at the Winchester Cathedral’s Wessex Center.

The event was organized by the Modern History Research Centre of the University of Winchester and our international research network The Hispanic-Anglosphere: transnational networks, global communities.

Enjoy!

Translations in the Hispanic-Anglosphere – this Friday @ the University of Manchester

The Principal Investigator of our international research network, Dr Graciela Iglesias-Rogers has been invited to give a keynote speech at Rethinking (Self)Translation in (Trans)national Contexts, a one-day conference at the University of Manchester this coming Friday.  The meeting aims to create an interdisciplinary space of discussion and analysis of the concept of (self-)translation and its political, sociological and ideological power.  Fittingly, the title of her address is ‘Translation and (Self)Translation in the Hispanic-Anglosphere: an interdisciplinary approach‘.

The talk is scheduled for 2pm, but the event is due to start at 9 am in the Conference Room C1.18, Ellen Wilkinson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6JA. For a complete agenda and to book your free entrance ticket, visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/rethinking-selftranslation-in-transnational-contexts-conference-tickets-61824235954

‘From Madrid to Tyntesfield: A story of love, loss and legacy’

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You can discover as from today in situ the Hispanic history of Tyntesfield, the spectacular National Trust property near Bristol through the exhibition From Madrid to Tyntesfield: A story of love, loss and legacy that tells the story of William Gibb’s fortune in the global Hispanic world. Drawing from our network’s last year pilot experience, this initiative is the result of the hard work and exquisite attention to detail of our fellow member Susan Hayward, curator of the National Trust for Bristol and Tyntesfield and her team of committed assistants, most of them volunteers.

The launch of the exhibition marked the 229 anniversary of the birthday of William Gibbs who was born in Madrid on 22 May 1790 at the heart of a family that operated within the vibrant Hispanic-Anglosphere of the time.

There will be ongoing displays within the house, seasonal events, new dishes on the menu and an autumn enlarged exhibition planned to last for at least two years and with a view to be periodically updated with new findings from our own research.

So make time to visit Tyntesfield and follow this site for further developments!

Photos and text: Dr Graciela Iglesias-Rogers, Principal Investigator of ‘The Hispanic-Anglosphere: transnational networks, global communities (late 18th-20th centuries)’   international research network funded by the AHRC and the University of Winchester in partnership with the National Trust Tyntesfield.

‘Transition’ – listen here to the podcast

Just click below if you missed or want to listen again the public conversation we held last Saturday on ‘Transition: tips and ideas from the Hispanic-Anglosphere (late 18th – early 20th centuries’ at the Wessex Center, a contemporary venue nestled in the beautiful inner close of the Winchester Cathedral. The event was organized by the Modern History Research Centre of the University of Winchester and our international research network The Hispanic-Anglosphere: transnational networks, global communities, a project funded by the Arts and Humanities Council and the University of Winchester in association with the National Trust.

We are aiming to provide soon full video as well, so keep tuned – and Enjoy!

Notes on key speakers:

Natalia Sobrevilla Perea is Professor of Latin American History and head of Hispanic studies at the University of Kent. She is also the principal investigator of the research network ‘War and Nation: identity and the process of state-building in South America (1800-1840)’. Dr Sobrevilla Perea was awarded her doctorate by the University of London in 2005 and her undergraduate degree was from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (1996). Her research interests include state formation and political culture in the Andes from the end of the colonial period throughout the nineteenth century as well as issues of identity, race and ethnicity, and military culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in South America.

Eduardo Posada-Carbó is Professor of the History and Politics of Latin America at the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies and William Golding Senior Fellow at Brasenose College University of Oxford.  He has been a visiting professor at various universities in Europe and in the Americas and has published extensively on the history and politics of Latin America, with a focus on Colombia.  He is the author of La nación soñada. Violencia, liberalismo y democracia en Colombia (2006), and of articles published in the Historical Journal, Hispanic American Historical ReviewLatin American Research ReviewIntellectual History ReviewJournal of DemocracyJournal of Latin American Studies, and Revista de Indias. He has also edited Elections Before Democracy.  The History of Elections in Europe and Latin America (1996); (with Iván Jaksic), Liberalismo y poder.  Latinoamérica en el siglo XIX (2011); and more recently a five volume history of Colombia, published by the Fundación Mapfre and Penguin Random House in Madrid.

Helen Cowie is Senior Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of York and a member of its Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies. Her research focuses on the cultural history of science with a particular focus on the history of animals.  She has published extensively on the subject, including  Cowie, H.L. (2017) ‘From the Andes to the Outback: Acclimatising Alpacas in the British Empire‘ Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, vol 45, no. 4, pp. 551-579 and her book Cowie, H.L. (2014) Exhibiting Animals in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Empathy, Education, Entertainment. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke.

Andrés Baeza Ruz is Postdoctoral Research Fellow on transnational education (Instituto de Historia de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile) has a PhD in Latin American History from the University of Bristol and is currently leading a programme of reform of the educational syllabus in Chile. His book Contacts, Collisions and Relationships: Britons and Chileans in the Independence Era, 1806-1831 has been recently published by Liverpool University Press (31st March 2019).

Graciela Iglesias-Rogers is Senior Lecturer in Modern European and Global Hispanic History at the University of Winchester and Principal Investigator in the AHRC-University of Winchester research network ‘The Hispanic-Anglosphere: transnational networks, global communities (late 18th-ealy 20th centuries) in partnership with the National Trust. She is also a former Reuters Fellow with a long career in journalism. An Oxford graduate (St. Hilda’s) and postgraduate (LMH) both as a mature student, her first academic book, British Liberators in the Age of Napoleon: volunteering under the Spanish Flag in the Peninsular War (London and New York: Bloomsbury, 2014) has been followed by other works, including a book co-edited with Prof. David Hook, Translations in Times of Disruption: an interdisciplinary study in transnational contexts (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

How to find us tomorrow 3 pm at the Winchester Cathedral’s Wessex Center

Come and join us in this open and free public conversation at the Winchester Cathedral’s Wessex Centre, access is via Dome Alley walking from the Cathedral’s inner courtyard – click HERE for a detailed map.

Saturday 11 May 2019, 3-5 pm

TRANSITION

Transición2

A few tips and ideas from the HispanicAnglosphere

(late 18th-early 20th centuries)

TransitionBluefellow talk

Everyday the news has been jam-packed with stories about impending transformation – call it Brexit, the twilight of the modern Elizabethan era with the possibility of a male regency, the end of the fossil economy and the rapid growth of the so-called industries of the future (virtual reality, driverless cars, etc.). Change brings both challenges and opportunities. The history of the British Isles and the global Hispanic world is full of good and bad examples of how to get through periods of transition. Five leading scholars from around the world have been invited to share through a round-table discussion a few tips and ideas about various experiences, particularly from the late eighteenth to early twentieth centuries, a period marked by the dislocation of global polities, the rise and fall of monarchies, empires and republics, nation-state building, the rise of nationalism as well as by technological and biological innovations that altered landscape and infrastructures forever.

Speakers: Dr Andrés Baeza Ruz (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile), Dr Helen Cowie (University of York), Prof. Eduardo Posada-Carbó (University of Oxford), Prof. Natalia Sobrevilla Perea (University of Kent); chaired by Dr Graciela Iglesias-Rogers (University of Winchester).

The event is organized by the Modern History Research Centre of the University of Winchester in association with The Hispanic-Anglosphere: transnational networks, global communities (late 18th-20th centuries)’, an international research network funded by the AHRC and the University of Winchester in partnership with the National Trust. For more info, please contact Dr Graciela Iglesias-Rogers (G.IglesiasRogers@winchester.ac.uk ) and/or visit the project’s online platform http://hispanic-anglosphere.com .

  All welcome!

Notes on Speakers:

Natalia Sobrevilla Perea is Professor of Latin American History and head of Hispanic studies at the University of Kent. She is also the principal investigator of the research network ‘War and Nation: identity and the process of state-building in South America (1800-1840)’. Dr Sobrevilla Perea was awarded her doctorate by the University of London in 2005 and her undergraduate degree was from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (1996). Her research interests include state formation and political culture in the Andes from the end of the colonial period throughout the nineteenth century as well as issues of identity, race and ethnicity, and military culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in South America.

Eduardo Posada-Carbó is Professor of the History and Politics of Latin America at the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies and William Golding Senior Fellow at Brasenose College University of Oxford.  He has been a visiting professor at various universities in Europe and in the Americas and has published extensively on the history and politics of Latin America, with a focus on Colombia.  He is the author of La nación soñada. Violencia, liberalismo y democracia en Colombia (2006), and of articles published in the Historical Journal, Hispanic American Historical ReviewLatin American Research ReviewIntellectual History ReviewJournal of DemocracyJournal of Latin American Studies, and Revista de Indias. He has also edited Elections Before Democracy.  The History of Elections in Europe and Latin America (1996); (with Iván Jaksic), Liberalismo y poder.  Latinoamérica en el siglo XIX (2011); and more recently a five volume history of Colombia, published by the Fundación Mapfre and Penguin Random House in Madrid.

Helen Cowie is Senior Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of York and a member of its Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies. Her research focuses on the cultural history of science with a particular focus on the history of animals.  She has published extensively on the subject, including  Cowie, H.L. (2017) ‘From the Andes to the Outback: Acclimatising Alpacas in the British Empire‘ Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, vol 45, no. 4, pp. 551-579 and her book Cowie, H.L. (2014) Exhibiting Animals in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Empathy, Education, Entertainment. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke.

Andrés Baeza Ruz is Postdoctoral Research Fellow on transnational education (Instituto de Historia de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile) has a PhD in Latin American History from the University of Bristol and is currently leading a programme of reform of the educational syllabus in Chile. His book Contacts, Collisions and Relationships: Britons and Chileans in the Independence Era, 1806-1831 has been recently published by Liverpool University Press (31st March 2019).

Graciela Iglesias-Rogers is Senior Lecturer in Modern European and Global Hispanic History at the University of Winchester and Principal Investigator in the AHRC-University of Winchester research network ‘The Hispanic-Anglosphere: transnational networks, global communities (late 18th-ealy 20th centuries) in partnership with the National Trust. She is also a former Reuters Fellow with a long career in journalism. An Oxford graduate (St. Hilda’s) and postgraduate (LMH) both as a mature student, her first academic book, British Liberators in the Age of Napoleon: volunteering under the Spanish Flag in the Peninsular War (London and New York: Bloomsbury, 2014) has been followed by other works, including a book co-edited with Prof. David Hook, Translations in Times of Disruption: an interdisciplinary study in transnational contexts (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

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